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Free Fall From Space

Felix Baumgartner will jump 120,000ft - less than 40 miles from SPACE - after having successfully completed a test jump in New Mexico Thursday

Watch the video here

Via Buzzfeed

Smallest is bigger than the biggest

The Scale of the Universe 2 is an interactive Powers of Ten that takes you from the Planck length all the way up to the size of the observable Universe. That’s more than 60 orders of magnitude! Also interesting that the smallest things (Planck length, strings, branes) are millions of times smaller compared to human scale than the observable Universe is larger. Plenty of room at the bottom indeed.

/via Kottke, one of the first RSS feeds I ever subscribed to, and still one of my favourites of all time.


  Asteroids named after fictional characters:
  2309 Mr. Spock


(via diositos)

Asteroids named after fictional characters: 2309 Mr. Spock

(via diositos)

(Source: demidieux)


  Space shuttle orbiter Atlantis left planet Earth on Friday, July 8, embarking on the STS-135 mission to the International Space Station.
  
  The momentous launch was the final one in NASA’s 30 year space shuttle program that began with the launch of the first reusable spacecraft on April 12, 1981.
  In this reflective prelaunch image from July 7, Atlantis stands in a familiar spot on the Kennedy Space Center’s pad 39A, after an early evening roll back of the pad’s Rotating Service Structure.
  
  The historic orbital voyages of Atlantis have included a Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, deployment of Magellan, Galileo, and the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory, and seven trips to the Russian space station Mir.
  
  Scheduled to dock once again with the International Space Station on Sunday, Atlantis has now made its 33rd and final trip to orbit.


via NASA Astronomy Picture Of The Day

Space shuttle orbiter Atlantis left planet Earth on Friday, July 8, embarking on the STS-135 mission to the International Space Station.

The momentous launch was the final one in NASA’s 30 year space shuttle program that began with the launch of the first reusable spacecraft on April 12, 1981. In this reflective prelaunch image from July 7, Atlantis stands in a familiar spot on the Kennedy Space Center’s pad 39A, after an early evening roll back of the pad’s Rotating Service Structure.

The historic orbital voyages of Atlantis have included a Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, deployment of Magellan, Galileo, and the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory, and seven trips to the Russian space station Mir.

Scheduled to dock once again with the International Space Station on Sunday, Atlantis has now made its 33rd and final trip to orbit.

via NASA Astronomy Picture Of The Day

via APOD: 2011 May 20 - A Journey Through the Night Sky


  At full resolution, the 5 gigapixel mosaic was stitched together from over 37,000 images, the result of a season following, year long effort and 60,000 travel miles in search of still dark skies in the American west and the western Cape of South Africa.

via APOD: 2011 May 20 - A Journey Through the Night Sky

At full resolution, the 5 gigapixel mosaic was stitched together from over 37,000 images, the result of a season following, year long effort and 60,000 travel miles in search of still dark skies in the American west and the western Cape of South Africa.

NASA announces results of epic space-time experiment

cunthorse:

“Einstein was right again.” Appropriate use of ‘epic’.

(via steelthunder-deactivated2011111)

unknownskywalker:

Titan and Saturn
This view of smoggy Titan against the limb of Saturn is composed of photos taken by Cassini on August 1, 2007 through red, green, and blue filters, so it shows the moon and planet approximately as they would appear to the human eye. Titan’s absorbing atmosphere is much darker than Saturn, whose light shines through Titan’s upper haze layers, particularly the north polar hood.

unknownskywalker:

Titan and Saturn

This view of smoggy Titan against the limb of Saturn is composed of photos taken by Cassini on August 1, 2007 through red, green, and blue filters, so it shows the moon and planet approximately as they would appear to the human eye. Titan’s absorbing atmosphere is much darker than Saturn, whose light shines through Titan’s upper haze layers, particularly the north polar hood.

unknownskywalker:

Tranquility by Tobias Roetsch
View full size image »

which one’s the moon; the one we’re standing on or the one eclipsing the sun?

unknownskywalker:

Tranquility by Tobias Roetsch

View full size image »

which one’s the moon; the one we’re standing on or the one eclipsing the sun?

There is no 3-D CGI involved in this amazing Saturn fly-by video…it’s made from thousands of hi-res photographs taken by the Cassini orbiter.

via Kottke.org

Exo-planets via Information Is Beautiful.
Click through for the full story

Exo-planets via Information Is Beautiful.

Click through for the full story

unknownskywalker:

Fastest spinning dust found; solves cosmic “fog” puzzle
Small specks of dust found in our Milky Way galaxy are the fastest twirlers yet—spinning more than ten billion times a second. Scientists found the tiny grains—each just 10 to 50 atoms wide—using the recently launched ESA’s Planck spacecraft.
The odd radiation has long been associated with dense, dusty clouds between stars, but its exact source was unclear. According to the Planck team, the new data suggest that some dust particles in these interstellar clouds are constantly colliding with fast-moving atoms and ultraviolet light.
The nonstop bombardments set the grains spinning, and their ultrafast rotation causes the grains to glow at much higher microwave frequencies than dust found elsewhere in the universe.
Most of the heavier elements that eventually go into building planets spent most of their life in this universe as dust particles. Understanding the different behaviors of space dust could help astronomers figure out exactly how stars and planets begin to take shape.
Image: Red regions in composite pictures of interstellar clouds show microwaves likely from fast-spinning dust.
• Source: full article at National Geographic

unknownskywalker:

Fastest spinning dust found; solves cosmic “fog” puzzle

Small specks of dust found in our Milky Way galaxy are the fastest twirlers yet—spinning more than ten billion times a second. Scientists found the tiny grains—each just 10 to 50 atoms wide—using the recently launched ESA’s Planck spacecraft.

The odd radiation has long been associated with dense, dusty clouds between stars, but its exact source was unclear. According to the Planck team, the new data suggest that some dust particles in these interstellar clouds are constantly colliding with fast-moving atoms and ultraviolet light.

The nonstop bombardments set the grains spinning, and their ultrafast rotation causes the grains to glow at much higher microwave frequencies than dust found elsewhere in the universe.

Most of the heavier elements that eventually go into building planets spent most of their life in this universe as dust particles. Understanding the different behaviors of space dust could help astronomers figure out exactly how stars and planets begin to take shape.

Image: Red regions in composite pictures of interstellar clouds show microwaves likely from fast-spinning dust.

Source: full article at National Geographic

(via reafan)

Follow Fuck Yeah Space now!

Follow Fuck Yeah Space now!

21 Greatest-Ever Space Photos

(via life)

I love space.